Emotions that could derail

People often draft a will with the best intentions, and even though the document may be technically sound, emotional decisions can have far-reaching consequences for the beneficiaries. They may even result in potential delays when winding up the estate.

To discuss the feelings or sentiments that could derail your estate planning, I’m joined by the CEO of the Fiduciary Institute of Southern Africa, Louis van Vuren. Louis, I’d like to discuss each of these emotions in some detail, but let’s unpack the issues first. What has been your experience? What are the five emotional issues that may create problems when winding up an estate?

LOUIS VAN VUREN: Ingé, firstly the desire to control – even after your death. Then also the desire to keep the peace – specifically in difficult family circumstances. Then there is also sympathy with struggling children, trying to look after your struggling children after your death, sometimes at the expense of other considerations. Feelings of guilt, or what I sometimes call debts of honour, when people feel they want to set the record straight or set things right in the will that they haven’t got round to during their lifetime. And then lastly feelings of superiority, whether it’s